FAQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: What is a Certified LEAP Therapist?

A: A Certified LEAP Therapist (CLT) can help you manage food sensitivities along with multiple other clinical symptoms and develop a diet that’s right for you, your lifestyle, and your health goals. A CLT has received advanced clinical training in adverse food reactions including food sensitivities, allergies, and intolerances along with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition. CLTs develop a personalized eating plan based on MRT blood test results called an ImmunoCalm Diet and assist clients with protocols designed to reduce inflammation that helps alleviate symptoms such as headaches, gastrointestinal distress, and more.

Q: Do you take insurance?

A: We do not bill to any insurance companies. However, we will provide the necessary documentation to submit to your insurance on your own for reimbursement.

Q: Is the MRT® covered by insurance?

A: Sometimes. Some companies cover the blood test and the package as one comprehensive bill; others ask for a breakdown between test cost and nutrition consult time and only cover one or the other part. When insurances won’t pay for any part of the program, people will often use HSA funds or Flex-plan funds.

Q: Do you take credit card payments?

A: Yes, we accept all major credit cards.

Q: Do you work with clients remotely?

A: Yes! I can work with anybody in any location within the United States. With the use of phone and computers, we don’t need to limit our work to office visits.

Read one client’s story of success: CLICK HERE 30-Day Migraine Results

Q: How do I know which food sensitivity test I should take?

A: There are many tests on the market today that claim to be food sensitivity tests. They may also claim to be the gold standard, or better than all other food sensitivity tests. They have a wide range of price points, reporting methods, and expert support. They also make claims about their accuracy – which in most cases is true. But if they aren’t truly measuring inflammation, the accuracy is irrelevant.

Even though the term food sensitivity encompasses a variety of adverse food reactions, in our practice we use the term to refer exclusively to non-IgE mediated immune responses to food.

The best true food sensitivity blood test is one that measures both Type III and Type IV immune responses.
CLICK HERE to read descriptions of various food sensitivity tests.

Q: What is the LEAP diet protocol connection to GI and Constitutional Symptoms in IBD patients?

This paper outlines results that support how the LEAP program really does change people’s lives how have Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Written by Haley Robertson, BS, RD, LD, Catherine Fontenot, PhD, RD, LDN, Janet Pope, PhD, RD, LDN, Dawn Erickson, MPH, RD, LDN

CLICK HERE to see an image
CLICK HERE to access the PDF


We know you have questions; let us help you answer some of the most common about our services and programs.

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